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Visit People's Park Plinth

Games Art

Project

Furtherfield’s Game Art programme draws on interdisciplinary practice that takes the engines and culture of digital games as the tools and materials of art practice.

Artists’ work in this field connects both with mainstream art world interests and atypical-audiences-for-art engaging them with aesthetic and game-play experiences that have them question the world in enjoyable ways.

Exhibition: Zero Gamer

Carnage Hug by Corrado Morgana uses the Unreal Tournament 2004 game engine, a hyper frenetic multiplayer future sports, first person shooter that turns into a bizarre, self-playing spectacle. The video documents the game's bots, artificially intelligent computer controlled adversaries, as they spring about and over each other until they naturally come to non-combative rest, having played out their algorithmic destinies
Carnage Hug by Corrado Morgana uses the Unreal Tournament 2004 game engine, a hyper frenetic multiplayer future sports, first person shooter that turns into a bizarre, self-playing spectacle. The video documents the game’s bots, artificially intelligent computer controlled adversaries, as they spring about and over each other until they naturally come to non-combative rest, having played out their algorithmic destinies

Zero Gamer looks at games played, unplayed and unplayable, the spectator and the spectacle. Sometimes we just like to watch, and machinima, gameplay videos and spectator gaming events take the activity out of interactivity. Zero Gamer presents games that play themselves, video documents of in-game performance, game engine experiments and challenging documentaries on gameplay.

Networked Exhibition: Game/Play

[giantJoystick] by Mary Flanagan Game/Play exhibition - 22 July - 3 September 2006
[giantJoystick] by Mary Flanagan. Game/Play exhibition – 22 July – 3 September 2006

Game/Play is a national touring exhibition that explores goal-orientated gaming and playful interaction through media arts practice. This collaboration between Q-Arts, Derby and HTTP, London has provided a framework to develop a context for creative exchange between visitors to the exhibition focusing on the rhetorical constructs game and play. Projects fall under three main categories: installations, independent video games and online (networked) artworks.

Publication: Artists Re:Thinking Games

Artists Re:Thinking Games Book Cover

Artists Re:Thinking Games is a publication that looks at how a selection of leading artists, designers and commentators have challenged the norms and expectations of both game and art worlds with both criticality and popular appeal. It explores themes adopted by the artist that thinks and rethinks games and includes essays, interviews and artists’ projects from Jeremy Bailey, Ruth Catlow, Heather Corcoran, Daphne Dragona, Mary Flanagan, Mathias Fuchs, Alex Galloway, Marc Garrett, Corrado Morgana, Anne-Marie Schleiner, David Surman, Tale of Tales, Bill Viola, and Emma Westecott.

Artists’ work in this field connects both with mainstream art world interests and atypical-audiences-for-art engaging them with aesthetic and game-play experiences that have them question the world in enjoyable ways.