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Help For Your Corona Arts Transition

As the Covid-19 global pandemic hits, we would like to offer our help to arts organisations and individuals who need to speedily pivot their programmes to digitally accessible models. At Furtherfield we have more than 20 years experience of the conceptual, technical and financial issues of producing arts programmes that straddle digital and physical space.

Over 1-hour online consultation calls we can assess what is at stake in arts projects previously planned for public venues and advise on suitable ways to transfer the work online. Our aim is to find active solutions that suit the work itself as well as the organisation and audience. There is no one-size-fits-all answer to questions of digital programming but we’d like to help you quickly and efficiently find the answer to yours. 

Each call will be offered for a flat fee of £250 and will be with both Artistic Director Ruth Catlow and Executive Director Charlotte Frost. Please contact us now to schedule a call (info@furtherfield.org). 50% of income from calls will go towards honouring fees for artists within our own programmes.

Featured Image:
The Blockchain – Change Everything Forever, 2016
Still from a Furtherfield film directed by Pete Gomes

News From Where We Are: The Furtherfield Podcast

A cultural discussion podcast grounded in news from where we are

We may be confined to our homes by the Coronavirus emergency but we still have access to thriving networked cultures from around the world.  ‘News From Where We Are’ is hosted by Furtherfield’s Marc Garrett, a conversation with many voices from the ground. The podcast explores how the collaborative-imaginative fieldwork of artists, techies and activists is informing how we organise, imagine and build solidarity, good health and post-capitalist realities. Working together and supporting others to do the same.

Each podcast includes your news from where you are, 3 interviews, a review, readings and announcements, to explore how people want to live in our globally-connected world now.

Send short audio recordings to marc.garrett@furtherfield.org in the style of local news headlines (up to 90 seconds) including your name, where you are, and your news. 

Also send your social media handles so that we can share the podcast with you.

Monthly on Soundcloud.
https://soundcloud.com/furtherfield

First broadcast April 2020
Interviews with Cassie Thornton, Cade Diem & Joseph DeLappe. Contributions from Jaya Klara Brekke, Régine DeBatty, Jeremy Height, and more…

May 2020
Interview with Gretta Louw. Contributions from Annie Abrahams, Azure Carter, Mac Dunlop, Paul Hertz, Daniel Pinheiro, and Eryk Salvaggio,
Jennifer Seaman Cook, and more…

Featured Image:
Illustration by Lina Theodorou, for ‘Bad Shibe‘ by Rob Myers

Published by Furtherfield and Torque editions, 2017

CultureStake

CultureStake is a web-based voting and connection system for decentralised cultural decision-making and investment.

Please DONATE to CultureStake by participating in the Gitcoin CLR matching experiment for funding public goods.

Your donation goes a LONG way!

Using quadratic voting on the blockchain, CultureStake’s playful front-end interface allows everyone to vote on the types of cultural activity they would like to see in their locality.

CultureStake democratises arts commissioning by providing communities and artists with a way to make cultural decisions together. It does this by giving communities a bigger say in the activities provided in their area, and by connecting artists and cultural organisations to better information about what is meaningful in different localities.

DoxBox trustbot by Alistair Gentry at Furtherfield’s Future Fair 2019. Curators: Hannah Redler Hawes and Julie Freeman. Produced as part of an ODI R&D project funded by InnovateUK

Using the CultureStake app, people are invited to consider the social and cultural relevance of particular artworks to their localities. And they are given a way to rank how strongly they feel about artworks and the issues they raise. Votes are tracked and made visible, giving evidence of the types of projects communities would most value.

Currently, major artists and cultural sponsors have the upper hand and this can result in one-size-fits-all ‘blockbuster’ programming. CultureStake is a practical response to a growing demand for greater transparency about how, and in whose interest, decisions about the public good are made. It opens the field for experimentation, for robust and sustainable alternatives to centralised and private decision-making practices.

The ultimate vision for CultureStake is that governance and funding of culture are put into the hands of audiences, artists and venues, acting together in and across localities and time.

In this way, we hope to increase a shared sense of agency, imagination, and alliances.

CultureStake Pilot at Leeds International Festival 2020

The CultureStake pilot is commissioned by the Leeds International Festival 2020 as part of Furtherfield’s Future Fairness. This is a family-friendly fair of art and technology activities to examine the future of the world we live in, and to invite participants to choose what they want to see in Leeds in the future. 

Using the CultureStake voting app they will decide together which project they would like to see commissioned on a larger scale in Leeds. 

DoxBox trustbot by Alistair Gentry. Curators: Hannah Redler Hawes and Julie Freeman. Produced as part of an ODI R&D project funded by InnovateUK

CultureStake Uses Quadratic Voting and the Blockchain

Quadratic voting (QV) was developed as an improvement on one-person-one-vote collective decision-making processes. It attempts to address the associated “tyranny of the majority” problems and data loss about voter intentions (so well understood by Post Brexit citizens of the UK). 

The significance of election and referenda results are dangerously open to interpretation and manipulation by authorities. By providing more information QV has the potential to allow communities of people to better understand what vote results say about their values and intentions.

How Does Quadratic Voting Work?

All participants receive the same limited number of voting credits that they can distribute to express nuanced preferences. For this reason, voters only use their voting credits on things that matter to them. The quadratic system also enables participants to express the intensity of their preferences for all options, but it costs them proportionately (quadratically) more credits to express strong feelings. (See table)

The CultureStake system will store voting data about each artwork on the Ethereum blockchain (a cryptographically secured distributed database) to guarantee ongoing access to tamper-proof public data. 

CultureStake tests the ability of QV on the blockchain to produce trusted voting data – secure, transparent, and permanent – about culture experienced in places.

> Voting creates communally-owned information about what matters to people on the culture that happens in places.

> Voting contributes to shared knowledge about collective preferences, attitudes, and values.

Software

CultureStake Software is published under a GNU Affero General Public License v3.0 AGPL-3.0

Main Repository URL: https://github.com/lazaruslabs/culturestake

Smart Contracts Repository URL: https://github.com/lazaruslabs/culturestake-contracts

Subgraph Repository URL: https://github.com/lazaruslabs/culturestake-subgraph

Infrastructure Provisioning URL: https://github.com/lazaruslabs/culturestake-provisioning

Credits

CultureStake is a DECAL/Furtherfield project. 

Concept by Ruth Catlow, Charlotte Frost & Marc Garrett. Contributions by Sam Hart, Irene Lopez de Vallejo, Gretta Louw, Rob Myers, Stacco Troncoso, and Ann Marie Utratel. 

Technical development by Sarah Friend & Andreas Dzialocha.

Visual identity by Studio Hyte

The Treaty of Finsbury Park 2025 Drop-in Sessions

Please join us to help make and play a game for multispecies cooperation. 

How do we collectively care for Finsbury Park?

Which people and which creatures? 

What part would you like to play?

We invite you to join us at Furtherfield to explore these questions. Together we will make and play a game with various characters, imagining Finsbury Park in 2025 as the place where a global multispecies revolution begins – and changes the world forever. 

How can you get involved?

Originally planned for the Summer of 2020, the first community meetings took place in March, however Covid-19 has paused the development of this project. If you would like to work with the game designers Cade and Ruth, and each other, from Furtherfield Commons and online email Ruth at ruthcatlow [at] gmail.com. 

About The Treaty of Finsbury Park 2025

At Summer Solstice a visiting delegation of artists, equipped with park blueprints, bylaws, data-sources, historical documents, and policies, will work with local envoys who present testimony from the many human and non-human lives of the park. Together, the two parties will work to mutually devise a treaty to govern the future actions of multispecies park users, turning the park itself into a “love machine”. This culminates in a public ceremonial treaty signing event. 

With a bit of luck the game, final treaty, audio recordings, photographs, and resulting artistic responses are now planned for development and exhibition at Furtherfield in the Summer of 2021. Part role play game, part participatory performance, this event will be based at Furtherfield Commons and across Finsbury Park for three days at the Summer Solstice.

The Treaty of Finsbury Park 2025: On systems, ecologies as networks, colonialism and seizing rituals of power.

Read the essay
Hear the discussion between Ruth and Cade on the Furtherfield Podcast
Illustration by Sajan Rai.

If you have any questions or would like more information email Ruth at ruthcatlow [at] gmail.com. 

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 870759, for CreaTures – Creative practice and transformations to sustainability.

Join the Fictional Focus Group

This is an invitation to participate in focus group research that is also a game

How are attitudes to data transparency and consumer ethics shifting?

We would like to invite you to participate in our research study that takes the form of a game with many characters called Fictional Focus Group. 

If you decide to take part we you will join a role-play game with 10-15 other people. You will get to escape your lock-down reality and play the role of a unique character who faces all the complex challenges of contemporary life.

The event itself will involve group discussion about the tricky choices your characters make as consumers or providers of food, clothing and money services. The game reveals the possible consequences of their actions as their data is reused in unforeseen ways.

The event will last for about 3 hours including 2 hours in the game and two 15 minutes breaks. Due to Covid-19, we are hosting this event online, using Zoom.

There are two sessions available:
29 and 30th June 2020
13.30 – 16.30
(now to be run online due to Covid-19)

For any enquiries, please email info@furtherfield.org

About the project

Findings contribute to a report, Glass Houses: Understanding transparency in information economies 2020.

Glass Houses is a research project that aims to investigate an end-user’s perception, understanding, and expectation of transparency in their engagement with modern information society, and in particular the role technologies, such as distributed ledgers, play in such engagement. It is funded by EPSRC through their Digital Economy Theme. glass-houses.cs.ucl.ac.uk

UCL Glass Houses Research Team: Sarah Meiklejohn is an Associate Professor in Cryptography and Security at University College London (UCL). Kruakae Pothong is a Research Fellow in Distributed Ledgers at University College London (UCL).

Fictional Focus Group is a Furtherfield/DECAL project created by Ruth Catlow with the UCL Glass Houses research team, developed in collaboration with Max Dovey.

The Hologram: An image of health in multi-dimensional crisis

A collective health project by Cassie Thornton and The Feminist Economics Department (the FED)

An insurgency of sick artists is organising to resist the global crisis of care, from bed and over the phone. In these days of compulsive overwork in the so-called creative economy, we’re all sick artists. Using ancient technologies of peer-to-peer care, a grassroots health monitoring and diagnostic system is emerging, practiced from beds and couches all over the world. Participants co-produce a multi-dimensional image of each other’s physical, psychological, and social health. We call this image The Hologram. Through workshops in the spring and at Furtherfield Gallery or online in the autumn, visitors can learn about the Hologram and audition for a place in this viral sci-fi health system. Look out for couch-based performances throughout Finsbury Park.

The Hologram is part of Furtherfield’s three-year Citizen Sci-Fi  programme crowdsourcing creative and technological visions of our communities and public spaces, together.

2020 is the year of Love Machines, nurturing living and machine systems for mutual care and respect on earth and beyond.

Love Machines Exhibition: 15 May – 21 Oct, Sat – Sun, 11:00 – 17:00, or by apt, Furtherfield Gallery, Website, and Social Media

Events

Please note The Hologram talk and workshops are now taking place online as a response to pandemic restrictions. Contact info@furtherfield.org if you need any further information or assistance.

Cassie Thornton is an artist and activist who makes a “safe space” for the unknown, for disobedience and for unanticipated collectivity. She uses social practices including institutional critique, insurgent architecture, and “healing modalities” like hypnosis and yoga to find soft spots in the hard surfaces of capitalist life. Cassie has invented a grassroots alternative credit reporting service for the survivors of gentrification, has hypnotized hedge fund managers, has finger-painted with the grime found inside banks, has donated cursed paintings to profiteering bankers, and has taught feminist economics to yogis (and vice versa). She has worked in close collaboration with freelance curators and producers including Taraneh Fazeli, Magdalena Jadwiga Härtelova, Dani Admiss, Amanda Nudelman, Misha Rabinovich, Caitlin Foley, and Laurel Ptak. Her projects, invited and uninvited, have appeared at (or in collaboration with) Transmediale Festival for Media Arts, San Francisco MoMA, West Den Haag, Moneylab, Swissnex San Francisco, Pro Arts Gallery & Commons, Dream Farm Commons, Furtherfield, Gallery 400, Strike Debt Bay Area, Red Bull Detroit, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, Flux Factory, Bemis Center for the Arts, Berliner Gazette and more.

Cassie Thornton presents The Hologram: Collective Health as a “Beautiful Art Work”

An Online Presentation + Workshop for Social Isolation in the Love Machines Season

Artist Cassie Thornton, of the Feminist Economics Department (the FED), will discuss The Hologram, a mythoreal collective peer-to-peer health project currently incubating at Furtherfield Gallery in London.

The Hologram, based on the understanding that all our crises are connected and everyone is a little sick, is a viral four-person health monitoring and diagnostic system practiced from couches all over the world.

Three non-expert participants create a three-dimensional “hologram” of a fourth participant’s physical, psychological and social health, and each becomes, in turn, the focus of three other people’s care in an expanding network.

This health distribution system is based on the experimental care models developed in the Social Solidarity Clinics in Greece during the height of the financial and migration crisis. The result is the construction of a robust network of multi-dimensional health, collectively oriented social practices, and trust that can outlive racial capitalism.

The presentation will be followed by a discussion of themes and topics. We welcome artists, healers, activists and system builders with an interest in alternative infrastructures and care as an act of resistance.

BOOKING ESSENTIAL

Please note The Hologram talk and workshops are now taking place online due to pandemic restrictions. Contact info@furtherfield.org if you need any further information or assistance.

About the artist

Cassie Thornton is an artist and activist who makes a “safe space” for the unknown, for disobedience and for unanticipated collectivity. She uses social practices including institutional critique, insurgent architecture, and “healing modalities” like hypnosis and yoga to find soft spots in the hard surfaces of capitalist life. Cassie has invented a grassroots alternative credit reporting service for the survivors of gentrification, has hypnotized hedge fund managers, has finger-painted with the grime found inside banks, has donated cursed paintings to profiteering bankers, and has taught feminist economics to yogis (and vice versa). She has worked in close collaboration with freelance curators and producers including Taraneh Fazeli, Magdalena Jadwiga Härtelova, Dani Admiss, Amanda Nudelman, Misha Rabinovich, Caitlin Foley and Laurel Ptak. Her projects, invited and uninvited, have appeared at (or in collaboration with) Transmediale Festival for Media Arts, San Francisco MoMA, West Den Haag, Moneylab, Swissnex San Francisco, Pro Arts Gallery & Commons, Dream Farm Commons, Furtherfield, Gallery 400, Strike Debt Bay Area, Red Bull Detroit, Elizabeth Foundation for the Arts, Flux Factory, Bemis Center for the Arts, Berliner Gazette and more.

The Hologram is part of Furtherfield’s three-year Citizen Sci-Fi programme crowdsourcing creative and technological visions of our communities and public spaces, together.

2020 is the year of Love Machines, nurturing living and machine systems for mutual care and respect on earth and beyond.

The FurtherList Archives

A list of recommendations, reflecting the dynamic culture we are part of, straddling the fields of art, technology and social change.

Permanent archive of all the FurtherLists.

FurtherList No.19 April 3rd 2020
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-19-april-3rd-2020/

FurtherList No.18 March 6th 2020
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-18-march-6th-2020/

FurtherList No.17 February 7th 2020
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-17-february-7th-2020/

FurtherList No.16 January 3rd 2020
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-16-january-3rd-2020/

FurtherList No.15 Nov 29th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-15-nov-29th-2019

FurtherList No.14 Oct 26th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-14-oct-26th-2019

FurtherList No.13 Sept 27th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-13-sept-27th-2019

FurtherList No.12 Sep 20th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-12-sep-20th-2019

FurtherList No.11 September 6th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-11-september-6th-2019

FurtherList No.10 August 30th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-10-august-30th-2019

FurtherList No.9 August 23rd 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-9-august-23rd-2019

FurtherList No.8 August 16th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/furtherlist-no-8-august-16th-2019

FurtherList No.7 Aug 9th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-furtherlist-future-fair-special-no-7-aug-9th-2019

FurtherList No.6 July 30th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-furtherlist-no-6-july-30th-2019

The FurtherList No.5 July 5th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-furtherlist-no-5-july-5th-2019

FurtherList No.4 June 21st 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-furtherlist-no-4-june-21st-2019

FurtherList No.3 June 14th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-weekly-furtherlist-no-3-june-14th-2019

FurtherList No.2 June 7th 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-weekly-furtherlist-no-2-june-7th-2019

FurtherList No.1 May 31st 2019
https://www.furtherfield.org/the-weekly-furtherlist-no-1-june-3rd-2019

Main image: Bad Shibe. Story by Rob Myers and Illustrations by Lina Theodoru. Wall installation. NEW WORLD ORDER exhibition, at Furtherfield 20 May – 25 June 2017. Photo by Pau Ros. https://www.furtherfield.org/new-world-order/

Future Fictions for Finsbury Park

Future Fictions for Finsbury Park is part of our Citizen Sci-Fi initiative. It brings together sci-fi writers in residence with local residents and set of scientific experts to explore written visions of a Finsbury Park of the future. 

For our 2019/2020 year of FF4FP we worked with sci-fi writers Mud Howard and Stephen Oram to create two new short stories about the park, based on deep research conducted  with community members and experts. Via a set of workshops organised by Producer, Ruth Fenton, participants were invited to explore both near and far future ideas based on the current knowledge we have of climate change and technological developments, to imagine how we might like to see Finsbury Park evolve.

Future Fair, Future Fictions of Finsbury Park, Mud Howard and Stephen Oram, Finsbury Park, London, 2019. Image Credit: Julia Szalewicz
Future Fair, Future Fictions of Finsbury Park, Mud Howard and Stephen Oram, Finsbury Park, London, 2019. Image Credit: Julia Szalewicz

At our Future Fair on 10th August 2019, both Mud and Stephen gave live readings of their stories, which will be published on the Furtherfield website this Autumn.

Future Fair, Future Fictions of Finsbury Park, Mud Howard and Stephen Oram, Finsbury Park, London, 2019. Image Credit: Julia Szalewicz
Future Fair, Future Fictions of Finsbury Park, Mud Howard and Stephen Oram, Finsbury Park, London, 2019. Image Credit: Julia Szalewicz

Sci-Fi writers:

Mud Howard (they/them)

A gender non-conforming poet, performer and activist from the states. mud creates work that explores the intimacy and isolation between queer and trans bodies. mud is a Pushcart Prize nominee. they are currently working on their first full-length novel: a queer and trans memoir full of lies and magic. they were the first annual youth writing fellow for Transfaith in the summer of 2017. their poem “clearing” was selected by Eduardo C. Corral for Sundress Publication’s the Best of the Net 2017. mud is a graduate of the low-res MFA Poetry Program at the IPRC in Portland, OR and holds a Masters in Creative Writing from the University of Westminster. you can find their work in THEM, The Lifted Brow, Foglifter, and Cleaver Magazine. they spend a lot of time scheming both how to survive and not perpetuate toxic masculinity. they love to lip sync, show up to the dance party early and paint their mustache turquoise and gold.

Stephen Oram 

Who writes thought provoking stories that mix science fiction with social comment, mainly in a recognisable near-future. He is one of the writers for SciFutures and, as 2016 Author in Residence at Virtual Futures – described by the Guardian as “the Glastonbury of cyberculture” – he was one of the masterminds behind the new Near-Future Fiction series and continues to be a lead curator. Oram is a member of the Clockhouse London Writers and a member of the Alliance of Independent Authors. He has two published novels: Fluence and Quantum Confessions, and a collection of sci-fi shorts, Eating Robots and Other Stories. As the Author in Residence for Virtual Futures Salons he wrote stories on the new and exciting worlds of neurostimulation, bionic prosthetics and bio-art. These Salons bring together artists, philosophers, cultural theorists, technologists and fiction writers to consider the future of humanity and technology. Recently, his focus has been on collaborating with experts to understand the work that’s going on in neuroscience, artificial intelligence and deep machine learning. From this Oram writes short pieces of near-future science fiction as thought experiments and use them as a starting point for discussion between himself, scientists and the public. Oram is always interested in creating and contributing to debate about potential futures.

Future Experts:

The Future Experts comprised of local residents of Finsbury Park, who brought invaluable knowledge of the area, and professional experts from a variety of scientific and design based backgrounds, who brought expertise in future thinking in many areas including health, transport, technology and architecture.

Expert Biographies

Ling Tan

Ling Tan is a designer, maker and coder interested in how people interact with the built environment and wearable technology. Trained as an architect, she enjoys building physical machines and prototypes ranging from urban scale to wearable scale to explore different modes of interaction between people and their surrounding spaces. Her work falls somewhere within the genre of the built environment, wearable technology, Internet of Things(IoT) and citizen participation. It involves working with various communities in different cities and uses wearable technology as tools to express their relationship with the city, touching on demographic, race, gender and the subjective experience of the city through people.

http://lingql.com/

Paul Dobraszczyk

I am a researcher and writer based in Manchester, UK, and a teaching fellow at the Bartlett School of Architecture in London. I’m currently researching anarchism and architecture as well as completing a co-edited book Manchester: Something Rich and Strange (Manchester University Press, forthcoming in 2020). I’m the author of Future Cities: Architecture and the imagination (Reaktion, 2019); The Dead City: Urban Ruins and the Spectacle of Decay (IB Tauris, 2017); London’s Sewers (Shire, 2014); Iron, Ornament and Architecture in Victorian Britain (Ashgate, 2014); and Into the Belly of the Beast: Exploring London’s Victorian Sewers (Spire, 2009). I also co-edited Global Undergrounds: Exploring Cities Within (Reaktion, 2016); and Function & Fantasy: Iron Architecture in Long Nineteenth Century (Routledge, 2016). I am also a visual artist and photographer and built the website http://www.stonesofmanchester.com. I blog at https://ragpickinghistory.co.uk/

Dr Rasmus Birk

I am a social scientist, currently working as a Visiting Postdoctoral Fellow at the Department of Global Health & Social Medicine, King’s College London. My research here explores the relationship between city life and mental health, specifically how living in the city leads, for some people, to the development of mental health problems. I am currently researching the experiences of young people with common mental health problems (such as depression, anxiety, or stress) in South East London. 

www.rasmusbirk.org

Dr Kate Pangbourne

University Academic Fellow at the Institute for Transport Studies (University of Leeds). She has an MA (Hons) in Philosophy with English Literature, an MSc in Sustainable Rural Development and a PhD in Geography – Environmental  (Transport Governance). Her research is oriented towards shifting our transport system and individual choices towards greater environmental sustainability, social inclusion and meaningful prosperity. She is particularly interested in the implications of rapid technological change in the transport sector. Current work includes improving the persuasiveness of travel behaviour messages (ADAPT, funded by EPSRC), enhancing the rail passenger experience (SMaRTE, funded by the EU through Shift2Rail) and the societal challenges posed by self-driving vehicles and new concepts such as Mobility as a Service. Proof of humanity: has children, grows vegetables, sews and knits, sings, plays the piano, and used to play jazz sax (badly). Weird info: is a Freeman of the Worshipful Company of Cordwainers and of the City of London (but lives in Scotland).

https://environment.leeds.ac.uk/transport/staff/971/dr-kate-pangbourne

Dr Christine Aicardi

Originally trained in applied mathematics, computer sciences and project management, with a MEng from the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussées in France. She worked for many years in the Information and Communication Technologies industry, where she held a variety of positions (analyst/programmer, junior consultant, sales engineer, major account manager). She returned to higher education and came to Science and Technology Studies in 2003 as a mature student. After her MSc at the London Centre for the History of Science, Medicine and Technology, she was funded by the ESRC through her doctoral studies, and in 2010, she completed her PhD in Science and Technology Studies at UCL, in the area of Artificial Life. She is currently a Senior Research Fellow for the Human Brain Project Foresight Laboratory. The Lab aims to evaluate the potential social and ethical implications of the knowledge and technologies produced by the Human Brain Project for European citizens, society, industry, and economy. Prior to this, she was Wellcome Library Research Fellow, working on a sociological history project focused on the later career of Francis Crick, British molecular biologist and geneticist, who in the 1970s moved to Southern California and became a neuroscientist.

Featured image: Rusty Russ Twisted Tree ReTwisted via photopin (license)

Connect for Creativity Project

Furtherfield are the exhibition partner in a new intercultural project for 2019-2020.

Connect for Creativity is an 18-month project led by the British Council, in partnership with Abdullah Gül University in Turkey and three creative hubs – ATÖLYE in Turkey, BİOS in Greece, Nova Iskra in Serbia. The project is co-funded by the European Union and the Republic of Turkey, through the Intercultural Dialogue programme. 

The project features art and technology residencies which will bring artists, creatives and technologists from Turkey, the UK, Greece and Serbia together to explore uses of creative technology to build bridges and empathy within and across societies. 

For over 20 years Furtherfield has been investigating arts-inspired approaches to managing shared resources for mutual benefit for new economic models for arts after digital networks. Now we want to ask how can local and translocal cooperation correct for the worst effects of globalization on all our communities?

We are therefore asking participants: ‘What Do You Need Where You Are?’. In this way we are inviting everyone to consider local needs and develop universal – or translocal – projects to address them.

We share our home in Finsbury Park with the UK’s largest Turkish and Greek communities, adjacent to – the UK’s largest Serbian community in West London. From here we will assemble a team of emerging curators from each of these groups to co-develop the exhibition. While a quadrilingual format will be key to all communication where each artwork, all marketing and PR assets, as well as quotes from local and translocal participants will be translated across each language. We will host ‘digital dinners’ and other events featuring food from local Turkish, Greek and Serbian restaurants. 

“The residencies will result in immersive and multimedia-rich artwork, powered by techniques of design research, human-centered design and speculative design. The artists will be asked to question what hopes and fears are associated with rapidly changing work and life environments in contemporary society, how a networked culture can develop cohesion and how to deal with uncertainty and change.”

For more information – please sign up for updates.

Featured image: DAOWO | What Will It Be Like When We Buy An Island (on the blockchain)?, with Ed Fornieles.

Citizen Sci-Fi Programme 2019-2021

This 3-year programme supports our Platforming Finsbury Park initiative. Between 2019-2021 we will produce exhibitions and events that combine citizen science and citizen journalism by crowdsourcing the imagination of local park users and community groups to create new visions and models of stewardship for public, urban green space. By connecting these with international communities of artists, techies and thinkers we are co-curating labs, workshops, exhibitions and Summer Fairs as a way to grow a new breed of shared culture.

#CitSciFi – crowdsourcing creative and technological visions of our communities and public spaces, together.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Time Portals 2019

The Time Portals exhibition, held at Furtherfield Gallery (and across our online spaces), celebrates the 150th anniversary of the creation of Finsbury Park. As one of London’s first ‘People’s Parks’, designed to give everyone and anyone a space for free movement and thought, we regard it as the perfect location from which to create a mass investigation of radical pasts and futures, circling back to the start as we move forwards.

Each artwork in the exhibition therefore invites audience participation – either in its creation or in the development of a parallel ‘people’s’ work – turning every idea into a portal to countless more imaginings of the past and future of urban green spaces and beyond.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Love Machines 2020

For this Olympic year we will consider the health and wellbeing of humans and machines.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Land Oracles 2021

For this year of predicted peak heat rises we will consider how machines can work with nature.

Futurescapes for Finsbury Park

Futurescapes connects local groups with our wider team of designers, researchers, techies and visionaries, to co-create new visions of Finsbury Park using immersive technology.

Crowd-Sourced Visions of the Future

Furtherfield disrupt and democratise arts and technology so that more people can be involved in the business of shaping their cultures and places. Our current focus is on ways to connect the governance and funding of culture to the communities that they serve.

We are currently developing a three year programme called Citizen Sci-Fi, in the heart of Finsbury Park where we have 2 venues: a gallery and a lab. Using the model of citizen science and citizen journalism we are crowdsourcing the imagination of park users and local community groups to create new visions and models of stewardship for public, urban green space.

Like many other public spaces, Finsbury Park has immense economic, social and natural value, yet there is a disconnect between the ‘owners’ of public space and the people that use (or should be) using them. Local councils have limited funds, the ‘superdiverse’ local population are not engaged in public consultations; and there are conflicts between park users and stakeholders.

Planning Together

Immersive models can be used as a tool for engagement through co-design, to discover how the council, park stakeholders including nearby property developers, and park users imagine its future and their involvement with it. Placemaking is recognised as a core part of regeneration, requiring a foundation of strong partnerships cutting across the public and private sectors, where social, cultural and ‘natural’ capital interleave to create stronger bonds and local identity.

We aim to co-design an immersive platform to facilitate the co-design of development in and around public spaces. It will engage with and directly benefit a number of stakeholders:

By coordinating and connecting Furtherfield’s international community of artists, techies and thinkers, and the groups that we work with in Finsbury Park, we have the opportunity to combine the powerful insights of grounded communities with experimental practitioners. We want to find a way to empower a long term collaboration across all these layers.

Futurescapes is an Audiences of the Future Design Foundations project, funded by Innovate UK (part of UK Research & Innovation)

Project Partners

Furtherfield
Golant Media Ventures
Wolf in Motion

Platforming Finsbury Park

We are based in the heart of Finsbury Park, which is used by roughly 55,000 people weekly in a neighbourhood described as ‘superdiverse’ for the nearly 200 languages spoken locally. Working with park users and stakeholders, artists, techies, researchers, policy-makers, and other local arts organisations we have developed a new approach to cultural co-creation in this much loved shared public space: ‘Platforming Finsbury Park’.

Our aims are to:

An important part of this work is our 2019-21 programme, Citizen Sci-Fi, designed to engage our local community in creative imaginings of the future of Finsbury Park. We are producing a range of participatory networked art practices that respond to today’s important questions, in this unique urban park context, that empower local participants, and draw on international areas of practice.

By transforming Finsbury Park into a canvas for participatory digital arts we want to explore how insights drawn from the locality, and meaningful co-created cultural experiences can improve wellbeing for people, establishing new arts practices for Finsbury Park and other public spaces and localities.

Read more about this project in our Spring 2018 Editorial

Citizen Sci-Fi Programme 2019-2021

This 3-year programme combines citizen science and citizen journalism by crowdsourcing the imagination of local park users and community groups to create new visions and models of stewardship for public, urban green space. By connecting these with international communities of artists, techies and thinkers we are co-curating labs, workshops, exhibitions and Summer Fairs as a way to grow a new breed of shared culture.

#CitSciFi – crowdsourcing creative and technological visions of our communities and public spaces, together.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Time Portals 2019

The Time Portals exhibition, held at Furtherfield Gallery (and across our online spaces), celebrates the 150th anniversary of the creation of Finsbury Park. As one of London’s first ‘People’s Parks’, designed to give everyone and anyone a space for free movement and thought, we regard it as the perfect location from which to create a mass investigation of radical pasts and futures, circling back to the start as we move forwards.

Each artwork in the exhibition therefore invites audience participation – either in its creation or in the development of a parallel ‘people’s’ work – turning every idea into a portal to countless more imaginings of the past and future of urban green spaces and beyond.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Love Machines 2020

For this Olympic year we will consider the health and wellbeing of humans and machines.

Citizen Sci-Fi: Land Oracles 2021

For this year of predicted peak heat rises we will consider how machines can work with nature.