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Speculating the Smart Metropolis in Hello, City!

18/03/2016
Chloe Stavrou

As part of transmediale’s opening night in Berlin, audiences were sat in front of three large screens and taken on a journey through the abstract infrastructures of the imminent ‘smart city’. Liam Young, a self-proclaimed speculative architect, narrated the voyage whilst beside him, Aneek Thapar designed live sonic soundscapes complementing the performance. For Young, the smart city is a space where contemporary anxieties are not only unearthed but increasingly multiplied. The smart city manufactures users out of citizens, crafting an expanse whereby the hegemonic grip of super-production evolves into a threateningly subversive entity. According to Young, speculative architecture is one of the methods of combating the city’s supremacy – moulding the networks within a smart city to facilitate our human needs within a physical realm. It is a means of becoming active agents in amending the future.

Courtesy of transmediale and the artist, 2016

Speculative architecture as a term is relatively new, however the concept’s origins date back to the 1970s Italian leftist avant-garde. Back then it was called ‘Radical Architecture’, a term initiated by SUPERSTUDIO’s conceptual speculation regarding the structures of architecture. SUPERSTUDIO’s methods were transcendental as they favoured the superiority of mental construction over the estranged act of building. The founders of the group, Adolfo Natalini and Cristiano Toraldo di Francia, acknowledged modernist architecture as reductive to man’s ability of living a free life since its core foundations were built on putative methods of indoctrinating society into a pointless culture of consumption. The development of The Continuous Monument was a declaration to end all monuments since the structure itself was designed to cover the expanse of the world. Its function was to form ‘a single continuous environment of the world that would remain unchanged by technology, culture and other forms of imperialism’ as stated by SUPERSTUDIO itself. A function sufficiently egalitarian, and in some respects utopic, The Continuous Monument, much like Tatlin’s Third International in the 1920s, was never intended to be built, but instead to uncover the notion of total possibility and arbitrariness. Likewise, Young’s performative smart city does not purpose itself around applicable techniques of construction – it creates scenarios of possibility exploring the autonomous infrastructures that lie between the premeditated present and the predicted future. Hello City! intends to transpire the idea that computation, networks and the anomalies that surround them are no longer a finite set of instructions, but instead constitute an original approach to exploring and facilitating speculative thought through imagined urban fictions.

Courtesy of SUPERSTUDIO

Liam Young’s real-time cinematic narration cruises us like a ‘driverless vessel’ through the smart city beyond the physical spectrum. The smart city becomes an omnipresent regulator of our existence, as it feeds on the data we wilfully relinquish. Our digital footprint re-routes the city, traversing us into what Young calls ‘human machines of the algorithm’. His narrative positions human beings as ‘machines of post-human production’ within what he names a ‘DELTA City’. As an envisioned dystopia which creates perversions between the past, present and future, Hello City! is reminiscent of Kurt Vonnegut’s post-modern narrative in Cat’s Cradle. San Lorenzo, the setting for Vonnegut’s book, is on the brink of an apocalypse – the people’s only conjectural saviour would be their deluded but devoted faith to ‘Bokononism’, a superficial religion created to make life bearable for the island’s ill-fated inhabitants. Moreover, the substance ‘Ice-9’, a technological advancement, is exploited far from its original purpose of military use, leading to looming disaster. Both Bokononism and the existence of Ice-9 resonate Young’s narrative as they explore the submissive loss of free will and the consequences of allowing the future to be dictated by uncontainable entities. In Hello City! the metropolis becomes despotic and even more complex as it is designed by algorithms feeding on information instead of the endurances and sensitivities of the human body.

Like software constructed by networks, the future landscape will be a convoluted labyrinth for physical beings. Motion within the city will be ordained by a form of digital dérive structured by self-regulated and sovereign systems. Young’s video navigates us through blueprint structures simulating the connections within networks thus proclaiming the voyage as unbridled by our own corporal bodies. The body is no longer dominant. He introduces us to Lena, the world’s first facial recognition image, originally a cover from a 1972 Playboy magazine. Furthermore, he makes references to Internet sensation Hatsune Miku as a ‘digital ghost in the smart city’ whilst the three screens project and repeat the phrase ‘to keep everybody smiling’ ten times. We may speculate that for Young, the smart city has the potential to function like Alpha 60, a sentient computer system in Godard’s film Alphaville, controlling emotions, desires and actions of the inhabitants in the ‘Outlands’. As Young dictates ‘the City, looks down on the Earth’ – it becomes a geological tool and engages the speculative architect to remain relevant within the ever-changing landscape of that space.

In a preceding interview, Young refers to the speculative architect as a ‘curator’, ‘editor’ and ‘urban strategist’ attempting to decentralise power structures from conventional and conformist architectural thought. In 2014, Young’s think tank ‘Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today’ envisaged and undertook a project titled New City. New City is a series of photorealistic animated shorts featuring the cities of tomorrow; one is The City in the Sea, another is Keeping Up Appearances and the last is Edgelands. Too often, these works are projected and interpreted with the foreseeable frowning of rising consumerism concurrent with the dissolute development of technological super structures. Without a doubt, the supposition that technology is alienating us from our identities as citizens of a city is undeniable and exhaustively linked to the creation of super consumers and social media. Nonetheless, New Cities is more than just about that – comparable to the architectural intrusions of SUPERSTUDIO, the narrative of Cat’s Cradle and Alphaville,New City underlines the impending subsequent loss of human liberty with the advent emergence of the smart city whilst Hello City! injects the audience in within it.

Young’s notion of the smart city is consolidated within a Post-Anthropocene existence. Without any dispute, our world will inevitably divulge a post-anthropocene reality, but until that critical moment arrives, acts of speculation, such as speculative architecture, only exist within the hypothesis of potentiality. In fact, throughout Hello City! speculation cannot be positioned as either a positive or negative entity – it appears to lie within a neutral area of hybridity and experimentation. The narrative of Hello City! is purely speculative and thus exceedingly experimental. Like much of SUPERSTUDIO’s existence, antithetical notions of egalitarianism and cynicism run throughout Hello City! triggering perpetual seclusion of the audience’s contemplations. Conflicting positions reveal an ambivalence resulting to escalated concerns towards the act of execution. Speculative architecture itself is a purely narrative process designed on a fictitious future that is not formulated and so the eternal battle between theory and practice will always occur. Uncertainties raise an issue of pragmatism and whether speculation, evidently in architecture, is commendable. Seeing as speculation for the future is, in its most basic form, an act of research, it is regarded as the most pragmatic practise when taking into consideration any future endeavours. As the performance draws to an end, Young declares that ‘In the future everything will be smart, connected and made all better’ and then indicates towards the contradicting existence of Detroit subcultures that the future map will be unable to locate. A message loaded with properties that are paradoxical and thus ambiguous in their intent, Hello City! occupies itself with inner contradictions that only create the possibility for plural futures, a functional commons for the infrastructure of tomorrow.

Chloe Stavrou was born in Cyprus on the 6th of April, 1993. In 2013, and during her studies at university, she founded an interdisciplinary non-profit arts organisation named Tech-à-tête in her hometown, Limassol, Cyprus. Originally, Tech-à-tête was her personal reaction to the 2013 economic crisis in Cyprus and began as a free pop-up music & visual arts festival where all proceeds were used to purchase school and art supplies for children in need. Ever since, Tech-à-tête has been expanding and evolving into an educational and cultural hub with one of its goals actively addressing the inadequecy of dispersing governmental funds equally to art and cultural sectors. Another goal is to showcase local artists of all disciplines through initiating cultural and social conversations in the limiting artistic environment that is Cyprus. During her English and Related Literature/History of Art BA studies at the University of York in the UK, she majored in Contemporary Art & Digital Culture, American Independent Film, Post-War European Film, Post-Colonial Writing, Art Theory and American Literature beyond the 20th Century. Furthermore, she wrote her dissertation, which was a cross-disciplinary piece of writing, on the presence of Manifesto Writing as a Performance Object in Jenny Holzer's early work, 'The Inflammatory Essays'. After graduating in July, 2015 she worked for Ashkal Alwan (a non-profit arts organisation in Beirut, Lebanon) and assisted in the production of their international cultural forum called 'Home Works 7'. She is now undertaking an Art Business MA at the Sotheby's Institute of Art. Her curatorial practice and critical writing interests are transdiscplinary with regards to medium and revolve around deciphering the complexities of an ever-evolving digital landscape in the presence of post-humanity, post-connectivity/post-intimacy and post-capitalism. She also likes to mock these terms sometimes. In addition, since 2012, she has also created a musical alter-ego called 'Kineza' which allows her to express herself through playing music, sharing music, curating music, thus giving her the ability to create a lack of context without fearing judgement. She has played in bars, clubs, venues and festivals in Cyprus, the UK and Lebanon.

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Chloe Stavrou was born in Cyprus on the 6th of April, 1993. In 2013, and during her studies at university, she founded an interdisciplinary non-profit arts organisation named Tech-à-tête in her hometown, Limassol, Cyprus. Originally, Tech-à-tête was her personal reaction to the 2013 economic crisis in Cyprus and began as a free pop-up music & visual arts festival where all proceeds were used to purchase school and art supplies for children in need. Ever since, Tech-à-tête has been expanding and evolving into an educational and cultural hub with one of its goals actively addressing the inadequecy of dispersing governmental funds equally to art and cultural sectors. Another goal is to showcase local artists of all disciplines through initiating cultural and social conversations in the limiting artistic environment that is Cyprus. During her English and Related Literature/History of Art BA studies at the University of York in the UK, she majored in Contemporary Art & Digital Culture, American Independent Film, Post-War European Film, Post-Colonial Writing, Art Theory and American Literature beyond the 20th Century. Furthermore, she wrote her dissertation, which was a cross-disciplinary piece of writing, on the presence of Manifesto Writing as a Performance Object in Jenny Holzer's early work, 'The Inflammatory Essays'. After graduating in July, 2015 she worked for Ashkal Alwan (a non-profit arts organisation in Beirut, Lebanon) and assisted in the production of their international cultural forum called 'Home Works 7'. She is now undertaking an Art Business MA at the Sotheby's Institute of Art. Her curatorial practice and critical writing interests are transdiscplinary with regards to medium and revolve around deciphering the complexities of an ever-evolving digital landscape in the presence of post-humanity, post-connectivity/post-intimacy and post-capitalism. She also likes to mock these terms sometimes. In addition, since 2012, she has also created a musical alter-ego called 'Kineza' which allows her to express herself through playing music, sharing music, curating music, thus giving her the ability to create a lack of context without fearing judgement. She has played in bars, clubs, venues and festivals in Cyprus, the UK and Lebanon. Share: Twitter Instagram Facebook